Deep Vein Thrombosis Specialist

Vein & Cardiovascular Center

Ashish Pal, MD, FACC

Cardiologist & Vein Specialist located in Orlando, FL & Sebring, FL

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot that can interfere with your circulation and increase your risk of a pulmonary embolism or stroke. Vein & Cardiovascular Center: Ashish Pal, MD in Orlando, Sebring, and Davenport, Florida, can diagnose deep vein thrombosis and provide customized treatments to restore your vascular health. If you’re concerned about deep vein thrombosis, call your nearest office or schedule a consultation online with Ashish Pal, MD, FACC, today.

DVT/May Thurner Syndrome Q & A

What is deep vein thrombosis?  

Deep vein thrombosis is a condition in which a blood clot forms in one of the veins located deep inside your body. In most cases, DVT develops in your legs, although they can also form in your pelvis or arms.

In many cases, deep vein thrombosis doesn’t cause any symptoms. However, you may notice pain or cramping, and your skin can become red or warm to the touch. 

If you develop any of these symptoms, it’s critical to talk to Dr. Pal at Vein & Cardiovascular Center, as the condition increases your risk of severe complications such as pulmonary embolisms. 

What is May Thurner Syndrome? 

DVT is the primary complication of May-Thurner syndrome. May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is caused when the left iliac vein is compressed by the right iliac artery, which increases the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left extremity. May-Thurner syndrome most commonly involves the right iliac artery and the iliac vein draining the left lower extremity, but we often see the involvement of the right lower extremity, as well, and/or involvement of both lower extremities.

 










What causes deep vein thrombosis?

Any condition that interferes with your circulation can contribute to deep vein thrombosis. For example, spending a significant amount of time without moving can increase your risk. 

DVT is a risk if you’re on bed rest or if you spend many hours sitting in a car or plane. Your risk of deep vein thrombosis also increases if you’re overweight or if you smoke. Additionally, blood clotting disorders and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can contribute to deep vein thrombosis.

How is deep vein thrombosis diagnosed?

Vein & Cardiovascular Center: Ashish Pal, MD uses vascular ultrasounds to diagnose deep vein thrombosis. If Dr. Pal suspects you have the condition, he orders the ultrasound to confirm the diagnosis and pinpoint its location in your veins.

Vascular ultrasounds are safe, noninvasive digital imaging studies that use sound waves to create images of your blood vessels. The images show DVT and other blockages that interfere with your circulation and vascular health. 

How is deep vein thrombosis treated?

Treatment depends on the location and severity of your deep vein thrombosis. For example, Dr. Pal may prescribe medication to break up the clot. He may also place a filter in your vena cava to prevent a clot that breaks loose from shooting to your lungs and triggering a pulmonary embolism. 

Dr. Pal may also suggest thrombolysis, a minimally invasive endovenous surgical procedure to break up a blood clot, or a thrombectomy to remove the clot surgically. 

If you’re concerned about deep vein thrombosis, call Vein & Cardiovascular Center: Ashish Pal, MD or make an appointment online today for expert diagnosis and treatment.